120416 - Edward Coyle, Doha Series, 2011
"I am intrigued by architectural and constructional processes; the accumulation of plans, materials and structures, and the way that each stage in this process sequentially obscures the previous stage as construction advances, brick by brick, towards its intended conclusion.A vast body of architecture exists only in the realm of the unbuilt, in the form of ideas, drawings or models. To engage in dialogue with these unrealised projections allows us to read beyond the surface of buildings.
My paintings represent my own (falsified) documentation of a building’s existence, where both real and invented architectural features percolate space. The painted layers of architectural structures can refer to the past, present or future of a building as well as the unrealised futures of any abortive projections.Architectural processes have parallels with my own painting technique, both in terms of how my compositions are conceived and also in the way they are executed.
My practice utilises sampled architectural imagery taken from architectural plans and conceptual designs, as well as from memory and imagination. I work these sampled structures or planes up onto canvas and then expand, disassemble or destroy them with each new layer of paint.The resulting works show an oscillation between the real and abstract, the temporary and the constant.”

120416 - Edward Coyle, Doha Series, 2011

"I am intrigued by architectural and constructional processes; the accumulation of plans, materials and structures, and the way that each stage in this process sequentially obscures the previous stage as construction advances, brick by brick, towards its intended conclusion.A vast body of architecture exists only in the realm of the unbuilt, in the form of ideas, drawings or models. To engage in dialogue with these unrealised projections allows us to read beyond the surface of buildings.

My paintings represent my own (falsified) documentation of a building’s existence, where both real and invented architectural features percolate space. The painted layers of architectural structures can refer to the past, present or future of a building as well as the unrealised futures of any abortive projections.Architectural processes have parallels with my own painting technique, both in terms of how my compositions are conceived and also in the way they are executed.

My practice utilises sampled architectural imagery taken from architectural plans and conceptual designs, as well as from memory and imagination. I work these sampled structures or planes up onto canvas and then expand, disassemble or destroy them with each new layer of paint.The resulting works show an oscillation between the real and abstract, the temporary and the constant.”