Nina and myself will be on the panel for this talk, which discusses student shows from the perspective of teachers, industry and galleries, as well as regarding student shows as a typology that can be compared and furthered. Adding your own voice to this discussion might appeal to students and teachers, or be particularly relevant to the summer schools and to recent exhibitions.
https://www.facebook.com/events/351715264957203/
Following on from their last event, ‘Crowd Talks: Intern Or…’ at the Book Club, Crowd continues to create a space for design discussion between a panel and an audience, instead of a traditional speaker-led event.
This time round Crowd will be discussing the relevance of degree shows, in collaboration with Brighton University third years - Car Park Show. We will explore why students are continuing to show their work in galleries, despite the prolific rise of blogs and online exhibition spaces.
We will also talk about the purpose of degree shows, both for the students themselves and for those in industry. Does the increase of incorporated workshops and events highlight student ownership or signal towards the work on the wall no longer being enough?
We’ve got some amazing speakers lined up for this event, including Lawrence Zeegan, Irene Fuga, Gem Barton, Hugh McEwen, Sarah Clark, Roderick Mills, Kraggy and Nina Shen-Poblete. Follow us at @crowdtalks to find out more. This event will be a free one, we look forward to seeing you there!
6-8pm Sunday 7th July 73-77, Britannia Road, Fulham, London, SW6 2JR
Hope to see you there.

Nina and myself will be on the panel for this talk, which discusses student shows from the perspective of teachers, industry and galleries, as well as regarding student shows as a typology that can be compared and furthered. Adding your own voice to this discussion might appeal to students and teachers, or be particularly relevant to the summer schools and to recent exhibitions.

https://www.facebook.com/events/351715264957203/

Following on from their last event, ‘Crowd Talks: Intern Or…’ at the Book Club, Crowd continues to create a space for design discussion between a panel and an audience, instead of a traditional speaker-led event.

This time round Crowd will be discussing the relevance of degree shows, in collaboration with Brighton University third years - Car Park Show. We will explore why students are continuing to show their work in galleries, despite the prolific rise of blogs and online exhibition spaces.

We will also talk about the purpose of degree shows, both for the students themselves and for those in industry. Does the increase of incorporated workshops and events highlight student ownership or signal towards the work on the wall no longer being enough?

We’ve got some amazing speakers lined up for this event, including Lawrence Zeegan, Irene Fuga, Gem Barton, Hugh McEwen, Sarah Clark, Roderick Mills, Kraggy and Nina Shen-Poblete. Follow us at @crowdtalks to find out more. This event will be a free one, we look forward to seeing you there!

6-8pm
Sunday 7th July
73-77, Britannia Road, Fulham, London, SW6 2JR

Hope to see you there.

Go and see Unit 12 at the Bartlett Show. One of us is always there to sell catalogues, so ask anything you like. Criticism also welcome.

(Source: gburn, via catrinastewart)

EUROPA Stage by Ada Projects in collaboration with Adam Donen

“A stage defines action. Actors define nothing - they just perform.” - Berthold Brecht

Europa is a musical and dramatic work seen through the prism of Brecht’s idea that a stage defines action more than the actors who perform upon it. We wanted to fuse architecture with music and performance and create a dramatic piece with the STAGE as the lead actor. EUROPA started with a bare skeleton of a stage and an orchestra and choir in the middle of the square. While the music played, slowly stagehands and actors brought objects, pieces of park furniture and games towards the centre. Some of the pieces were pushed, some were worn as costumes and some were played as musical instruments. The pieces became a composite stage, which grew to 6 times its original size. These elements then began to ‘perform’ as part of the opera.

For more information this is the Ada website, www.adaprojects.co.uk/europa.html
The performance of EUROPA begins in just under 30 minutes in Bedford Square. 

The performance of EUROPA begins in just under 30 minutes in Bedford Square. 

The Hunterian Gallery, Glasgow, has one of Mackintosh’s houses bursting from its brutalist concrete panelling.

The 70’s building is clad in a reconstruction of the house where Mackintosh lived, positioned roughly 100 meters from where it had previously existed. With the front steps removed, this strangely places the front door several feet off the ground.

The incredible interior landscapes of Brixton Rec.

Ensemble Universitaire, Rue Tolbiac by M. Andrault, 1973.

Very cute cycle lockers from Haldo

The Montreuil Conservatory, by Claude Le Goas, 1976. Each of the metal pods on the façade is an acoustically separated practice room. It is an exceptionally advanced building, featuring an irrigated steel structure which has beams filled with water to slow their disintegration in the case of a fire.

Pablo Bronstein’s full scale Pavilion for the Monuments exhibition at Lismore Castle, Ireland, tests out the language of his drawings. It’s a thin printed graphic held up by scaffolding at the front and rear. The story goes that the design originally only had scaffolding behind the image, but when builders who were installing the graphic sent work in progress photos, Bronstein asked them to keep the “real” scaffolding up. It looks fantastic set in the topiary of the castle, but it feels very much like a drawing, rather than a 3D work. It is more akin to Matthew Darbyshire’s recent work The T Rooms, which is interesting as both artists are represented by Herald Street Gallery.

The EcoHat isn’t a beanie made of hemp, it is Richard Rogers’ contemporary chimney.

Were “EcoHat” to come up in passing, you would most likely think of something chunky, organic, and woolen–—perhaps a beanie with earflaps to keep you toasty while chained to a logger’s truck. But in fact, the EcoHat is an innovative environmental housing feature created by British architects Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners (the new name for Richard Rogers Partnership) for the wonderfully un-British Oxley Woods development. The colorful set of detached homes is situated on the edge of the much-maligned planned community of Milton Keynes, about 50 miles northwest of London.

Designed in response to a government competition to create a £60,000 ($121,000) eco-friendly home, the panelized Oxley Woods houses are manufactured off-site, transported, filled with recycled-paper insulation, and erected in about seven days. To minimize costs, service areas such as kitchens, bathrooms, and heat controls are standard on all homes, though the buildings vary in size from 700 to 1,615 square feet.

Another standardized feature is the EcoHat. Perched atop the roofs of each of the 145 houses, this is a powerhouse of energy efficiency in a small aluminum box, delivering a neatly packaged system that combines solar power with a home’s circulatory system. Within the EcoHat, solar power heats air as it enters through the roof. This warm air then passes through filters into the living space, or can be used to heat water by means of a heat-transfer coil.

“Inside the EcoHat is a tried-and-tested system called Sunwarm,” explains Andrew Partridge, an associate at Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners. “What we did was manufacture housing that allows us to fit the Sunwarm to all of the properties. In it is a dry solar panel collector, which air is passed over.”

The EcoHat is as typical of the Oxley Woods design as an old-fashioned chimney. The unit is easily accessible from inside the home, allowing for repairs and updates to technology without the need for a cherry picker.

The EcoHat’s casing conceals its unsightly gadgetry, while still allowing the solar panels to be angled for maximum efficiency. “Sometimes in environmental housing you have to orientate the houses quite vigorously,” says Partridge. “This allows for the house to be orientated in any direction, while the EcoHat always points in the appropriate direction for solar efficiency.” To that end, the architects claim that the Ecohat-wearing home can offer up to 50 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions.

Time will tell whether the EcoHat will be the feature that marks a new generation of British homes, but if it becomes half as ubiquitous as the top hat or the bowler once was, then this piece of rooftop millinery will undoubtedly be declared a resounding success.”

http://www.dwell.com/green/article/green-beret

Busáras looks more like it’s from Las Vegas than Dublin. Designed by Michael Scott, the 1953 building features flairs of pattern, colour and texture.

Come along to the opening of the Europa Print Show tonight :
http://londonarchitecturediary.com/event.php?id=3749
An exhibition of work by inspired by the Europa Stage, designed for The Bloomsbury Fete and the London Festival of Architecture 2013.
Opening: Thursday 30 May 2013, 6.30pm - 9.30pm
40 Store Street, London, WC1E 7DB

Come along to the opening of the Europa Print Show tonight :

http://londonarchitecturediary.com/event.php?id=3749

An exhibition of work by inspired by the Europa Stage, designed for The Bloomsbury Fete and the London Festival of Architecture 2013.

Opening: Thursday 30 May 2013, 6.30pm - 9.30pm

40 Store Street, London, WC1E 7DB

Gorgeous models from Nat Chard’s most recent project, The Institute of Paradoxical Shadows. Expect to see more of it in his upcoming book with Perry Kulper as part of the Pamphlet Architecture series, and on his website 

Deep, animated landscapes from 2D beat ‘em up arcade games.